Adge Cutler & The Wurzels

"CUTLER OF THE WEST" LP


This was the third 'live' album released by Adge Cutler & The Wurzels, originally released in September 1968 as a 12" vinyl LP on the Columbia record label. It was released simultaneously in both mono (catalogue number SX6263) and stereo (catalogue number SCX6263). It was subsequently repressed in stereo a further four times between 1969 and 1979. A cassette tape release came in 2003 accompanied by a CD release.

The Band Line-Up:

Supporting Adge Cutler, 'The Wurzels' are credited on the sleeve notes as being Tommy Banner (Accordion/Piano), Reg Quantrill (Guitar/Banjo) and Henry Davis (Bass/Sousaphone/Violin) all of whom appear on the sleeve artwork. This was the only one of Adge's original LPs where Henry appeared as a 'Wurzel'. He is also credited on this album for the 'Musical Arrangements'.

Track Listing:

  • Side 1
  • 1. Drink Up Thy Zider (Play On) (Cutler)
    2. The Charlton Mackrell Jug Band
        (Sheldon)Interpolating MacNamara's Band
        (O'Connor-Stamford)
    3. In The Haymaking Time (Cutler) Interpolating
        Sing Something Simple (Adams-Barnes-
         Logan)
    4. Five Foot Flirt (Tawney)
    5. Thee's Got'n Where Thee Cassn't Back'n
        Hassn't? (Cutler)
    6. Dorset is Beautiful (New lyrics and adap.
       Crozier)
    7. Up The Clump (Cutler)
  • Side 2
  • 1. Drink Up Thy Zider (Play On) (Cutler)
    2. The Chandler's Wife (New lyric and
       adapt. Kinsey)
    3. The Bristol Song (Barratt)
    4. The Marrow Song (Oh! What A Beauty)
        (Siebert)
    5. A Pub With No Beer (Parsons)
    6. Oh! Sir Jasper (New lyric and adapt. Barratt)
    7. The Wurple-Diddle-I-Doo Song (Fryberg-
        Donnop- Kirsten) (The Village Band)
    8. Drink Up Thy Zider (Play Off) (Cutler)

The Album:

Having recorded two albums at his 'local' - the Royal Oak in Nailsea - the decision was made to record Adge's third album at the Webbington Country Club in Loxton, Zummerzet. ​ This was a regular gig spot for Adge so it was perhaps a natural choice to make an album there. The recording took place on the evening of Saturday 4th July 1968 - Adge simply wrote in his diary the word 'recording'.

Interestingly, and possibly confusingly, Adge also recorded in his diary that on Thursday May 9th he did a 'recording' and in a later interview with Roger Bennett on the BBC Radio Bristol in 1971 stated that on that date he recorded his new album at the Webbington. It therefore seems possible that the album was recorded over two gigs.

The "Stage & Television Today'' newspaper (image left) however had a short article by Doug Williams describing the 'exuberant and hilarious' occasion..... ​ 

In contrast the "Gramophone Magazine" reported, in a rather straight manner, in its November 1968 issue that 'Those liking rural humour will enjoy “Cutler Of The West” by Adge Cutler and the Wurzels (Columbia SX 6263 / SCX 6263) recorded at the Webbington Country Club, Loxton, Somerset and redolent of the best rough cider. A single culled from it is Up The Clump, coupled with Aloha, Severn Beach (Columbia DB 8462)'.

​ Like Adge's previous albums this was a 'live' performance of 13 tracks by the band interwoven with typical Adge humour and comment and with the exception of 'Up The Clump' (side 1 track 7) none had been released by the band before.

The Tracks:

All the tracks appear to be live recordings as opposed to inserted and 'edited' studio takes on this album. The drummer, 'Dapper Dan', is introduced by Adge as helping them out on 'Up The Clump' (side 1 track 7) but it is clear on close listening that he also provides the drums on several other tracks. He was no doubt part of the house-band at the Webbington. Another point of note is the use by Henry Davis of the violin on 'Pub With No Beer' (side 2 track 5) - the only time it is believed that a violin appeared on an Adge album!

Of the 15 tracks listed on this album three were 'play on' and 'play off' by the house band (rather odd why these very short items were actually listed) the remaining twelve all being 'new' releases by Adge and The Wurzels.


'Up The Clump' (side 1 track 7) had been released as a Columbia single (pictured - DB8462) in the August (with Aloha Severn Beach as the B side) a bit of pre-release publicity - although this single version of 'Up The Clump' is a different take to that on the album - the single version is very upbeat with a bit of Tijuana brass, most definitely a studio recording! ​

Side 1 track 2 'The Charlton Mackrell Jug Band' was written by Kevin Sheldon and Trevor Crozier. It is the tale of the trials and tribulations of forming a band - and what happened when they finally got success. The song has been recorded in various local versions, Trevor Crozier's original 'The Piddletrenthide Jug Band' was based in Dorset (subsequently also recorded by The Yetties), while 'The Plonkers' relocated it to Hampshire with their 'Dibden Purlieu Jug Band'. And as the location is only mentioned in the title anyway, the song lyrics don't change wherever the singer bases it! Adge can be heard rehearsing this song before this album release in his 1967 rehearsal tapes.

Side 1 track 3 'In The Haymaking Time' Interpolating 'Sing Something Simple' Adge describes as 'a very old song of mine which we done years ago and we haven’t done it for a few year'. It was actually one of the first songs Adge put onto record (along with 'Drink Up Thy Zider' and 'Easton In Gordano') way back in 1958 when he recorded an acetate along with Acker Bilk and a few mates. This acetate only survives in Adge's own collection - All three tracks have the Acker clarinet treatment but the Haymaking song was not unlike the version laid down in this album. The first live performance at a gig for this song was in September 1967.

Side 1 track 4 'Five Foot Flirt ' written by west countryman and friend of Adge, Cyril Tawny (died 2005) in 1950. Although Cyril recorded it himself it was made popular by the Yetties in the 1960s. Adge's version here is a pretty straight version of the original by Cyril.

Side 1 track 5 'Thee's Got'n Where Thee Cassn't Back'n Hassn't?' This is a typical old-style Adge composition and seems to have first been performed in public at a gig in Ashton Court, Bristol, in September 1967. Adge's notebooks for this reveal his abbreviation for it - CBH!

Side 1 track 6 'Dorset is Beautiful' an adaptation by Dorset singer Trevor Crozier (although many others did similar variations) of a folksong which goes back at least as far as 1636 and was first published in the mid to late 1800s. Most unusual item for Adge to choose, there is no evidence that he performed it at gigs.

Side 1 track 7 'Up The Clump ' an Adge Cutler original, date of writing not known but it was first performed in September 1967 at a gig in Ashton Court, Bristol.


Side 2 track 2 'The Chandler's Wife' (New lyric and adapt. Kinsey) This is an old Irish tavern folksong, recorder by numerous artists over the years. Adge's version was adapted by Butch Kinsey.

Side 2 track 3 'The Bristol Song ' - another contribution to Adge's repertoire from the pen of producer Bob Barratt.

​ Side 2 track 4 'The Marrow Song (Oh! What A Beauty)' another song recorded by numerous artists over the years and written in the early 1950's by Edrich Siebert. It is unclear if Adge actually included it very often in his gigs, but his Wurzels in later years had it as a standard number thoroughly enjoyed by all.

Side 2 track 5 'A Pub With No Beer ' a song was written by Gordon Parsons, based on a poem, in the early 1950's in Australia, based around the poem writer's local pub. Again, it is one of those songs captured on record by many singers around the world.

Side 2 track 6 'Oh! Sir Jasper' another track adapted by Bob Barratt. Originally it was an old folksong and the opposite of a 'cumulative song', lyrics being omitted with each verse.

Side 2 track 7 'The Wurple-Diddle-I-Doo Song' Adge always referred to this as 'the German song' - another of his compositions that first saw the light of day at at a public gig at Ashton Court, Bristol, in September 1967. Originally composed in 1933 as a piece for small German bands by Mart Fryberg, Peter Kirsten and Teo von Donop, Adge added his own nonsensical words!  



Below is a promotional card issued by Columbia Records around the time of the release of 'Cutler Of The West' - from left to right Reg Quantrill, Tommy Banner, Henry Davis and Adge Cutler. This particular item is autographed on the reverse by the band with a reference to 'Up The Clump' added by Tommy Banner.

Disc and Label Variations:

This LP was originally released on the Columbia blue/black label, in both mono and stereo simultaneously. It appears that although there were no further mono pressings but the album was repressed four times in stereo and can be found on both versions of the Columbia EMI silver-black single box label and also on both variations of the silver-black two box label

The examples below and the associated statistics are taken from the collection of Professor Wurzel and represent what a collector should expect to find. For more information on references to matrix information (including information on acetates), vinyl tax codes , album sleeves, singles sleeves, and Columbia album labels, then refer to the Vinyl Collecting Guides on the main menu.

Image Ref. 1
1968 first mono pressing of SX6263, on the blue/black Columbia EMI label with the XAX3641 and XAX3642 matrix. It is interesting to find an Adge disc manufactured with a second mother (in this case side 1). It infers that either there was a problem with the first mother or production rates were high enough to warrant the production of a second mother.

This disc comes in a triple flipback sleeve (1963-1971 style) and generally the crimson EMI advertising inner sleeve type F . The inner sleeve can also be found in the previous styles A to E. The catalogue reference on the outer sleeve rear top right corner notes the availability of a stereo version of the LP.
The luxury goods tax code 'KT' can be seen embossed onto the vinyl on side 2. ​This pressing's vinyl weight is 144g, on the lighter side for a blue/black Columbia pressing. 

Image Ref. 2
Mono pressing of SX6263, on the blue/black Columbia EMI label with the XAX3641 and XAX3642 matrix. As in the example above this disc was pressed using a second mother. With no tax code this disc was pressed post December 31st 1968.​ This disc is different to the previous example, albeit to a very minor degree, but of interest to collectors nevertheless, is that the '1' for 'side one' beneath the publishing date is slightly offset compared to the one shown in Image Ref. 1. This would have been due to a reprinting of the label and a variation in the typesetting.
This disc comes in a triple flipback sleeve (1963-1971 style) and generally the crimson EMI advertising inner sleeve type F . The inner sleeve can also be found in the previous styles A to E. The catalogue reference on the outer sleeve rear top right corner notes the availability of a stereo version of the LP. This pressing's vinyl weight is 153g, a good weight and typical of early blue/black Columbia pressings.

Image Ref. 3
First stereo pressing of SCX6263, on the blue/black Columbia EMI label with the YAX3641 and YAX3642 matrix. No pressings with a master or mother code other than '1' have been found to date. With no tax code this disc was pressed post December 31st 1968.
This disc comes in a triple flipback sleeve (1963-1971 style) and generally the crimson EMI advertising inner sleeve type F . The inner sleeve can also be found in the previous styles A to E. The catalogue reference on the outer sleeve rear top right corner does not mention the availability of a mono version of the LP, although this does appear in the small print on the bottom flap with the sleeve production information. ​ This pressing's vinyl weight is 156g.

Image Ref. 4
1969 second stereo pressing of SCX6263, on the silver and black single box Columbia EMI label with the YAX3641 and YAX3642 matrix. No pressings with a master or mother code other than '1' have been found to date.

The catalogue reference on the outer sleeve rear top right corner does not mention the availability of a mono version of the LP, although this does appear in the small print on the bottom flap with the sleeve production information. ​

This disc comes in a triple flipback sleeve (1963-1971 style) and generally the crimson EMI advertising inner sleeve type F . This pressing's vinyl weight is 150g.

Image Ref. 5 ​
1969 - 1971 third stereo pressing of SCX6263, on the silver and black single box Columbia EMI label with the YAX3641 and YAX3642 matrix. No pressings with a master or mother code other than '1' have been found to date. ​

The catalogue reference on the outer sleeve rear top right corner does not mention the availability of a mono version of the LP, although this does appear in the small print on the bottom flap with the sleeve production information. ​ This disc can be found in the triple flipback sleeve (1963-1971 style) or double flipback sleeve (1970-1973 style) and normally the crimson EMI advertising inner sleeve type either F or G. This pressing's vinyl weight is 156g.

Image Ref.6
​ 1971 - 1973 fourth stereo pressing of SCX6367, silver and black double box Columbia EMI label with the YAX3942 and YAX3943 matrix. No pressings with a master or mother code other than '1' have been found to date. ​

This disc comes in either the triple flipback sleeve (1963-1971 style), the double flipback sleeve (1970-1973 style) or the wrap-around sleeve (1973 onwards) and can be found in inner sleeve G - a crimson EMI advertising inner sleeve - or the EMI company sleeves H or J. This vinyl weighs in at 164g - unusually heavy for records produced at this time. 

Image Ref. 7
1973 - 1979 fifth stereo pressing of SCX6367, silver and black double box Columbia EMI label with the YAX3942 and YAX3943 matrix. The rim text refers to 'EMI Records Ltd', the company name change that came into being on July 1st 1973. No pressings with a master or mother code other than '1' have been found to date. ​
The outer sleeve is of the new wrap-around design (1973 onwards). This sleeve design resulted in the loss of the information previously appearing on the flaps, so the 'filing' information (previously 'File under STANDARD' and 'Humorous Records' ) and the printer and catalogue reference information (Garrod & Lofthouse etc etc) did not appear. The words 'Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd' only were printed along the bottom edge of the sleeve. A minor consequence of the wrap round sleeve is that the top and bottom edges (but not the spine) are now white, previous designs had the cover image folding over. ​ The inner sleeve can be of type G to L covering 1973 - 1980.

Album Sleeve Details:

All sleeve variations are essentially the same content-wise with just minor changes to filing information, printer etc. except for the final stereo pressing sleeve where the names of the band members have been removed.
Version 1:

Triple flipback album sleeve 1967-1971 with laminated front and flaps, original mono pressing.
Spine text        'Cutler of the West/Adge Cutler & The Wurzels' 

Version 2:

 Triple flapback album sleeve 1967-1971 with laminated front and flaps, original stereo pressing.

Spine text 'Cutler of the West/Adge Cutler & The Wurzels'

Version 3:

Double flipback album sleeve 1970-1973 with laminated front and flaps, stereo repressing.

Spine text     'Cutler of the West/Adge Cutler & The Wurzels'

Version 4:

Wrap-around album sleeve 1973 onwards with laminated front, stereo repressing.

Spine text 'Cutler of the West/Adge Cutler & The Wurzels'

The outer sleeve had a change to the text on the back compared to the previous editions. Firstly the reference to the vehicle in the front artwork was removed and also, rather more oddly, the names of the members of the band were also removed.

Album Transcript:

Collectors' Extras:


Relatively rare copy of 'Cutler Of The West' nicely autographed by Adge together with the signatures of Tommy Banner, Reg Quantrill and Tony Baylis. Tony, of course, didn't actually play on this recording. This example comes in a 1973 wrap around sleeve with the vinyl being of the two-box design and so dating from the 1972 to pre-July 1973 period.

Collectors' Extras:


Very rare copy of 'Cutler Of The West' with the word 'STEREO' on the front of the sleeve, top right corner'. The print is under the lamination so was part of the original manufacture. The sleeve is a triple flipback with the vinyl label being the blue/black Columbia both which puts this as a pressing made between 1968 and 1971. On the rear of the sleeve a past owner has written in pencil ' 25.1.69 '.

Collectors' Extras:


This unusual and rare copy of the 'Cutler Of The West' LP came from the personal collection of Bob Barratt - Adge's record producer and close friend - and is known as a 'factory sample' - as can be seen from the label on the image - 'factory sample - not for sale'. Most records had a few pressings with label like this and it was purely a quality assurance check. From a collector's point of view it often means that the record has been played once to test and then filed away.

This particular example is a 1973 - 1979 fourth stereo pressing of SCX6263, silver and black double box label variation on the Columbia EMI label with the YAX3641 and YAX3642 matrix with the outer sleeves of the new wrap-around design (1973 onwards) and an inner sleeve type J both in near mint condition as is the vinyl. It has a stamper code of '1 GO' on side 1 and '1 GL' on side 2. The vinyl weighs in at 121g which is pretty standard for vinyl produced in the mid 1970's.

Cutler Of The West - Album Song Lyrics

  • Side 1
  • 1. Drink Up Thy Zider (Play On) (Cutler)
    2. The Charlton Mackrell Jug Band
        (Sheldon)Interpolating MacNamara's Band
        (O'Connor-Stamford)
    3. In The Haymaking Time (Cutler) Interpolating
        Sing Something Simple (Adams-Barnes-
         Logan)
    4. Five Foot Flirt (Tawney)
    5. Thee's Got'n Where Thee Cassn't Back'n
        Hassn't? (Cutler)
    6. Dorset is Beautiful (New lyrics and adap.
       Crozier)
    7. Up The Clump (Cutler)
  • Side 2
  • 1. Drink Up Thy Zider (Play On) (Cutler)
    2. The Chandler's Wife (New lyric and
       adapt. Kinsey)
    3. The Bristol Song (Barratt)
    4. The Marrow Song (Oh! What A Beauty)
        (Siebert)
    5. A Pub With No Beer (Parsons)
    6. Oh! Sir Jasper (New lyric and adapt. Barratt)
    7. The Wurple-Diddle-I-Doo Song (Fryberg-
        Donnop- Kirsten) (The Village Band)
    8. Drink Up Thy Zider (Play Off) (Cutler)

Side 1

Side 1, Track 1 - Drink Up Thy Zider (Play on) [by venue’s house band]


Side 1, Track 2 - The Charlton Mackrell Jug Band

I always planned to make this band the very finest in the land
So, we had to hold auditions, for to find the best musicians
Some who played they made the grade, some they played like ‘ell
I picked the best in all the west, and here's the personnel
There's Bernard Mace on his old string bass, made form a gurt big packing case
'Long with 'ee goes Amos Draper, wizard of the comb and paper
Arnold Slugg, he blows the jug, barred from all the locals
I'm the star wi' my guitar, harmonica and vocals

What was worse and made us curse was finding somewhere to rehearse
Neither of the pubs would wear us for it seemed they couldn't bear us
Folks all laughed and called us daft, we took it on the chin
We was always fond of the old duckpond, till they threw us in
Then Bernard Mace he sailed through space, followed by his homemade bass
Amos Draper he did try, to keep his roll of paper dry
Arnold Slugg went glug glug glug, very quickly sank
And my gumboots were full of newts when I reached the other bank

Now we hadn't been barred from the old churchyard, there one night we practiced hard
Every man was full of cider, doing his best with CC Ryder
Figure in white then come in sight, I thought we'd waked the dead
But Parson Sterk in his nightshirt said we waked he instead
Then Bernard Mace with his old string bass, said we better had leave this place
Off he blew with Amos Draper, trailing yards of toilet paper
Arnold Slugg wi' his two-gallon jug, for speed was not designed
I run like a fox sir with the parson's boxer following I close behind

Then one day old Farmer Gray, he come to me and this did say
All his beasts like music played 'em, would we kindly serenade 'em
Off we sped to the old cowshed, the cows they did adore us
They wagged their tails and banged their pails and joined in every chorus
Then Bernard Mace in the old string bass, a gurt big Jersey licked his face
Another got attached to Amos Draper, chewed up half his roll of paper
Filled the jug of Arnold Slugg, is kindness to acknowledge
And I got a kiss from a pretty young Miss in the Agricultural College

So, in one week we quite uniquely, topped the charts in the Farmer's Weekly
Play your cows our rhythm and blues you'll get three times more milk than usual
We've got plans and lots of bans, no rivals do we fear
Cos every cow knows Mama don't allow no jug band music in here
Now Bernard Mace has a shirt of lace, and his hair completely hides his face
So, does that of Amos Draper, getting in between his comb and paper
Arnold Slugg ‘as an op-art jug, we broke our Mother's hearts
We look so queer in all this gear, since we hit the charts



Side 1, Track 3 - In The Haymaking Time

Met my little darling, in the haymaking time, in the haymaking time, down West
I loved my little darling, in the haymaking time, that's when me darling looked her best

Oh, her eyes were like the summer skies that shine on Somerset
Her hair like sun browned hay laid on the mound
I met my little darling in the haymaking time
Wonder where's my little darling now?

I met my little darling on a fine summer's day, standing there with a hayfork in her hand
The flowers in her hair, made her a picture rare, thought she was the finest in the land

Oh, I dreamed of all the happy times we'd have when we were wed
When I'd make her take that final vow
Yes, I met my little darling in the haymaking time
Wonder where's my little darling now?

Left my little darling on a cold winter's morn, when frost and snow lay on the ground
She said dear be true, and I'll come back to you, when next haymaking comes around

Now a year has flown, the fields are mown, harvest gathered in
Things don't seem to be the same somehow
I met my little darling in the haymaking time
Wonder where's my little darling now,
Wonder where's my little darling now



Side 1, Track 4 - Five Foot Flirt

Now don't say Jim Johnson weren't with 'ee last night
I heard him as plain as can be
I was crossing the mound when I heard a strange sound
Down by the sycamore tree
I thought p'raps a cow had got stuck in the mud
And pulled her foot out with a moo
But I'm satisfied now that that noise weren't a cow
It was Jim kissing you

(Chorus)
You'm a five-foot flirt in the robes of an angel
You better had leave I alone
By the way you're acting it nearly unnerves I
The thing that preserves I is my joviality
Though I've got trouble as thick as the stubble
T'is you that's the worst of them all
Keep out of my track, and if you wanna come back
You can crawl, crawl, crawl

Remember what happened last Saturday night
The air was so peaceful and still
Like a bolt from the blue came a hullaballoo
A growling and cackling so shrill
It came to me head as I crawled from me bed
There's a fox at me chickens that's true
I crept out in me socks and bumped into the fox
It was Jim kissing you

(Repeat Chorus)

Now what's your excuse for last Sunday in church
It fair turned the poor vicar grey
While the organist was rendering "Lead Kindly Light"
Jim Johnson kept pumping away
Then all of a sudden, the organ stopped short
The vicar got into a stew
When he went round behind tell me what did he find
He found Jim kissing you

(Repeat Chorus)



Side 1, Track 5 - Thee’s Got’n Where Thee Cassent Back'n, Hassn't?

Flo and Joe, they liked to go, every Sunday afternoon
On a bike made for two they'd travel far
But Flo lived in Totterdown, they gurt steep hills they got her down
She said "Joe, you'll have to go and buy a motor car"
But Joe he bought a banger, twas there he dropped a clanger
For every time he'd take his girly out
From pub or club or football ground
He couldn't turn the darn thing round
Everywhere he'd go you'd hear them shout

(Chorus)
Oh, thee's got'n where thee cassent back'n hassn't
Thee's got'n in a fine old mess somehow
Thee's never oughta stuck'n in there dissn't
Now what bist gonna do about it now?
Thee's cop a packet if thee's cassent shift'n
For a copper always turns up from somewhere
Oh, ah thee's been and got'n where thee cassent back'n hassn't
Now how bist gonna get'n out of there?

Flo and Joe they liked to go, shopping every Saturday
Their little motor car was all they'd need
But Joe got stuck down round the centre, up a street thee cussn't enter
How he cried, when he tried, to get through to Broadmead!
He got hot round the collar, and Flo began to holler
And a traffic warden said “You can't park here”
"Shut up mutt" said Joe and put
His back wheel on the warden's foot
All of Bristol heaved a mighty cheer

(Repeat Chorus)

One fine day on holiday, they took the motor car abroad
With a brand-new GB plate, they'd head for France
For Flo and Joe were keen to see, the night delights of gay Paree
Snatch an hour up Eiffel Tower and grab some quick romance
But twas near the place de Gally, got jammed up a back alley
Woke up everybody in Montmartre!
Gendarme said "Ooh la la oui oui"
And Joe said, "Don't tell I, tell 'ee"
They Paris-ites all hollered out real hearty

(Repeat Chorus)

Wi' out a corkscrew
'Ow bist gonna get'n out of there?



Side 1, Track 6 - Dorset Is Beautiful

Now…

(Chorus)
Dorset is beautiful wherever you go
And the rain in the summertime makes the Wurzel bush grow
And it's pleasant to sit amid the thunder and the hail
With your sweetheart on an emmet button near the sweet nightingale

As I went out walking one morning wi' a lass
Some Dorsetshire farmers I happened for to pass
Says one to the other as we passed them by
"There be more birds in the long grass than there be in the sky"

Oh…

(Repeat Chorus)

Now I looked at Gwendoline and she looked at Ned
What a handsome young couple, they ought to have been wed
"Oh no" says the farmer, "Impossible of course
For Gwendoline's me daughter and Ned ‘ees me horse”

And…

(Repeat Chorus)

Now Sarah's my sweetheart and I love her so
She's big as a haystack and forty-year old
Now farmer he do laugh at us, isn't often he do scoff
For you have to leave a chalk mark just to show where you left off

And…

(Repeat Chorus)



Side 1, Track 7 - Up The Clump

Well everybody what's wrong with me
Shaking like a man on the old scrumpy

Oh, there's trees and hedges and all sorts of vegies up the clump
(Up the clump up the clump up the clump up the clump)
Oh, there's a three-legged spider and a jar of cider up the clump
(up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump)
There's a four-foot ferret and a swarm of bees,
A bald-headed badger and a dog with fleas
There's even a housemaid with housemaid's knees up the clump
(Up the clump up the clump up the clump up the clump)

Oh, there's a one-eyed rabbit with a dirty habit up the clump
(Up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump)
There's a ten-ton marrow and an old wheelbarrow up the clump
(Up the clump up the clump up the clump up the clump)
There's an old grey goat what chews barbed wire,
Rusty old bike without a tyre
There's half the Treorchy Male Voice Choir up the clump
(Up the clump up the clump up the clump up the clump)

[Spoken] Oy then! Thee bissn't nothing but a hedgehog, get off my brown suede gaiters Oh ar

Rumpa durdle I duh di doh doh doh
Wur pa dee dee, wur pee di lido

Oh, there's an old cock pheasant that ain’t too pleasant up the clump
(Up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump)
There's a stoat with a stammer and a nine pound hammer up the clump
(Up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump)
There's a deaf and dumb doctor and a Chinese monk'll,
Cure a broken leg or gurt carbuncle
There's Batman and Robin and the Man from UNCLE up the clump
(Up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump)

Oh, there's a bloke called Dannel and a spot-faced spannel up the clump
(Up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump)
There's the farmer's daughter and a pail of water up the clump
(Up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump)
Now Dannel tried to flannel the farmer's daughter,
She run like a hare, but he just caught her
They ain’t doing something they shouldn't oughta up the clump
(Down at the clump)

Oh, the moon shines bright on Nempnett Thrubwell uuhhhh
Up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump, up the clump
Wass think of 'ee!



Lyrics Kindly transcribed by M.Pelling & E.Bryant,
Verified by Professor Wurzel



Side 2

Side 2, Track 1 - Drink Up Thy Zider (Play on) [by venue’s house band]


Side 2, Track 2 - The Chandler’s Wife

As I went into the chandler's shop, some candles for to buy
I looked around the chandler's shop, but no one did I spy
So, I got disappointed and some angry words were said
When I heard the sound of a BOOM-BOOM-BOOM right above me head
When I, heard the sound of a BOOM-BOOM-BOOM right above me head

Well I was slick and very quick and up the stairs I sped
And I was most surprised to find the chandler's wife in bed
And with her was another man of quite enormous size
She was serving him BOOM-BOOM-BOOM right before me eyes
And, she was serving him BOOM-BOOM-BOOM right before me eyes

Now when the fun was o'er and done the lady raised her head
And most surprised was she to find me standing by the bed
If you will be discreet said she, and if you'd be so kind
You too can come up for some BOOM-BOOM-BOOM whenever you've the mind
You too can come up for some BOOM-BOOM-BOOM whenever you've the mind

So many a night and many a day when the chandler wasn't home
To buy meself some candles to the chandler's shop I'd roam
But ne'er one she'd give to me she'd serve me with instead
A little bit more of that BOOM-BOOM-BOOM to light me way to bed
Just a, little bit more of that BOOM-BOOM-BOOM to light me way to bed



Side 2, Track 3 - The Bristol Song

Oh, there's lots to see in Bristol so come down and look around
But best beware cos places there ain’t always what they sound
There's no fish in the Fishponds, no hay in Haymarket
If you're coming far don't come by car, there's no place you can park it
There's no white cliffs at Hartcliffe, you'll be out of luck
And you won't see hens in Henbury, and all the downs is up

Oh, there's lots to see in Bristol so come down and look around
But best beware cos places here ain’t always what they sound
There ain’t been sea at Seamills, since thirteen-ninety-seven
Direct your feet to old Bond Street, you won't see Oh-Oh-seven
There's no food in the feeder, it's all a load of bull
And all the girls in Horfield are quite respectable, really

Oh, there's lots to do in Bristol, so come down and look around
But best beware cos places here ain’t always what they sound
There's no black horse at Blackhorse, no cribs in Cribb's Causeway
The cops are strict, you might get nicked, so best keep out the law's way
The broom don't grow at Broomhill, no Frenchmen at Frenchay
And even at Blaise Castle, they don't need fire brigade

Oh, there's lots to see in Bristol so come down and look around
But best beware cos places here ain’t always what they sound



Side 2, Track 4 - The Marrow Song (Oh! What A Beauty)

Down the road there lives a man I'd like you all to know
He grew a great big marrow for the local flower show
When the story got around, they come from far and wide
When the people saw the marrow, everybody cried

(Chorus)
Oh! What a beauty, I've never seen one as big as that before
Oh! What a beauty, it must be two foot long or even more
It's such a lovely colour, and nice and round and fat
I never thought a marrow could grow as big as that
Oh! What a beauty, I've never seen one as big as that before

He was leaning on the garden gate the other day
And beckoned to a lady who lived just across the way
Took her down the garden path and showed it her with pride
When she saw the size of it the little lady sighed

(Repeat Chorus)

Then the flower show was held, and everybody went
To see the great big marrow lying there inside the tent
Soon the judges came along to give the prizes out
They only took one look at it and they began to shout

(Repeat Chorus)

Hey!



Side 2, Track 5 - A Pub With No Beer

It's a long way away from your kinsfolk and all
By the feeder at night when the tawny owls call
But there's nothing so lonesome, morbid or drear
Than to stand in the bar of a pub with no beer

Now the publican's anxious for the quota to come
But the brewery's on strike, everybody looks glum
A barmaid's gone cranky, the cook's acting queer
What a terrible place is a pub with no beer

There's a dog on the doorstep, for his master he waits
But the boss is inside drinking scrump with his mates
He hurries for cover and he cringes with fear
It's no place for a dog, is a pub with no beer

Oh, Billy the blacksmith, first time in his life
He's gone home cold sober to his darling wife
He walks in the door, she says "Early my dear"
But he breaks down and tells her "The pub's got no beer"

But never mind, there's plenty of cider! Ah-hey



Side 2, Track 6 - Oh! Sir Jasper

Oh, Hark to the tale, of a poor Winford lass
And her first entry into society
She went out with a knight
But alas he got tight
And lost any sense of propriety

Oh! Sir Jasper do not touch me! Oh! Sir Jasper do not touch me
Oh! Sir Jasper do not touch me! As we wurdle urdle I doh doh

Oh! Sir Jasper do not touch! Oh! Sir Jasper do not touch
Oh! Sir Jasper do not touch! As we wurdle urdle idle idle o

Oh! Sir Jasper do not! Oh! Sir Jasper do not
Oh! Sir Jasper do not! As we wurple urdle idle idle o

Oh! Sir Jasper do! Oh! Sir Jasper do
Oh! Sir Jasper do! As we wurper durdle idle idle lo

Oh! Sir Jasper! Oh! Sir Jasper! Oh! Sir Jasper
As we wurper durdle idle idle o

Oh! Sir! Oh! Sir! Oh! Sir
As we wurper durdle idle idle o

Oh! Oh! Oh!
As we wurper durdle idle idle lo



Side 2, Track 7 - The Wurple-Diddle-I-Doo Song

Rum-pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doo
Rum purdle i-da, rum purdle i-da i doh
Rum-pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doh
Rum purdle i-da rum purdle i oh duh di

Rum-pa durdle i-duh di dordle i-da loh
Wurple durdle i-da di dor duh doh
Rum-pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doh
Rum purdle i-da rum purdle oh duh doh

[Spoken by Adge] Ere’s Reg, ‘ee’s gonna have a go now, ‘n see what ‘ee can do”

Rum-pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doo
Whap durdle i, whap durdle i vi doh
Sur pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doh
Whap durdle i, whap durdle i wi di doh

Rum-pa durdle i-da di dordle i-da doh
Wurple durdle i-da di dor duh doh
Rum-pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doh
Whap durdle i, whap durdle i vi di doh

[Spoken by Adge] Ere’s that yer Tommy, ee’s gonna have a go now, see what ‘ee can do

Wurple diddle i doo li doodle li doo
Rum tid-a-liddy, rum tid-a-liddy li doh
[Spoken in background] Sweet…
Wurple diddle i doo li doodle li doo
Rum tid-a-liddy, rum tid-a-liddy li doh

Rum-pa durdle i-da di dordle i-da doh
Wurple durdle i-da di dor duh doh
Wurple diddle i doo li doodle li doo
Snob-glob, [pig snort] snob-glob [pig snort] i doo

[Spoken by Adge] ahh wake up Henry it’s your turn now, come on get up there

Wurple diddle i doo di dumpa di doh
Wurp diddle i, wurp diddle i di doh
Wurple diddle i doo di dumpa di doh
Wurp diddly, wurp diddly li doh

Rum-pa durdle i-da di dordle i-da loh
Wurple durdle i-da di dor duh doh
[Instrumental… ]

[Spoken by Adge] We’ll let ‘ee know Here’s the serious part then now, very straight

Rum-pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doh
Wurp purdle i-da rum purdle i-da ri doh
Wurple durdle i-da di dumpa di doh
Wurp purdle i-da rum purdle i-da oh duh doh

Wurpa durdle i-da di dorpa i-da doh
Wurpa durdle i-da di dorpa doh
Rum-pa durdle i-da di dumpa di doh
Rum purdle i-da rum purdle I rum ay um
Hey


Side 2, Track 8 - Drink Up Thy Zider (Play off) [by the venue’s house band]