Dating Adge Cutler's Columbia 7" Single Sleeves

Professor Wurzel's Guide

Singles record sleeves are there to protect your treasured vinyl...but to collectors they are also another valuable source to dating the record. Over the years Columbia changed the design of their sleeves quite regularly. This is not a definitive way of dating the release of your record but can give a good idea. Be aware though - owners didn't always put their records away in the right sleeves - and also when the design of a sleeve changed the packing department often used up previous stock before starting on the new! 


But this guide should tell you what sleeve your record should have left the factory in!

Columbia singles records in the 1960's and early 1970's were each given a unique reference number. Known as the 'DB' series Adge's first single, 'Drink Up Thy Zider' was DB8081 and his last one in 1971, (a reissue of his first) was DB9031, with there being nine altogether. The images below show what sleeves would be expected to house which Adge Cutler single based on the DB series number.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Columbia deep-red 'Morphy-Richards' advertising sleeve in use from 1965 through to 1966 - before the release of Adge's first single.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Columbia three-circle green 'Hit Make-Up' advertising sleeve in use from 1966 with a wavy top edge. As used for initial run of Adge Cutler & The Wurzels 'Drink Up Thy Zider' in 1966 on Columbia DB8081.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Columbia three-circle green 'Miners Hair Colour Shampoo' advertising sleeve in use from 1966 to 1967 with a wavy top edge. As used for initial run of Adge Cutler & The Wurzels 'Champion Dung Spreader' in 1967 on Columbia DB8145.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Columbia three-circle green 'Miss Disc makes four new hits' advertising sleeve in use from 1967 with a wavy top edge. As used for initial run of Adge Cutler & The Wurzels 'I Wish I Was Back On The Farm' in 1967 on Columbia DB8222.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Colourful Columbia picture sleeves (fronts only shown) used for a short period advertising Columbia EMI albums. No Adge Cutler singles issued whilst these were in use.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Columbia five-circle green EMI advertising sleeve in use from 1967 with wavy top edge. Used for the initial run of Adge Cutler & The Wurzels ' All Over Mendip' in 1967 on Columbia DB8277  

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Deep blue and green Columbia sleeves used for a short period advertising EMI products. No Adge Cutler singles issued whilst these were in use.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above Columbia six-circle red EMI sleeve advertising sleeve current EMI albums. Curved top edge or wavy top edge. Used for the initial runs of Adge Cutler & The Wurzels 'Don't Tell I, Tell 'Ee' on Columbia DB8399 in 1968, 'Up The Clump' on Columbia DB8462 in 1968 and finally 'Ferry To Glastonbury' on Columbia DB8614 in 1969

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Deep blue and red Columbia sleeves used for a short period advertising EMI products and albums. No Adge Cutler singles issued whilst these were in use.

The Wurzels Archives
The Wurzels Archives

Above: Columbia six-circle red EMI double sided sleeve. Flat and notched top edge. Used in initial runs of Adge Cutler & The Wurzels 'Poor, Poor Farmer' on Columbia DB8793 in 1971 and 'Drink Up Thy Zider' on Columbia DB9031 in 1974 .

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