Adge Cutler & The Wurzels

"THE CHAMPION DUNG SPREADER"
b/w "WHEN THE COMMON MARKET COMES TO STANTON DREW"


This was the third 7" 45 rpm vinyl single by Adge Cutler & The Wurzels, released on 10th March 1967. It was issued on the Columbia EMI record label in mono, catalogue number DB8145.

The Band Line-up:

At the time of the recording of this single the Wurzels supporting Adge were Reg Quantrill, Reg Chant, John Macey and Brian Walker. Brian Walker left the band only a week or two before the record was released.

The Tracks:

This was Adge's follow-up single to his Somerset anthem 'Drink Up Thy Zider' - and as Adge maintained it was Somerset's answer to Lonnie Donegan's 1960 hit 'My Old Man's A Dustman'. The single failed to chart. Despite that both tracks on this single were performed at just about every gig Adge played from 1966 through to 1968.

At first sight it appears that both tracks are taken from his first album "Adge Cutler & The Wurzels" (released 10 days before this single) but on close listening the title track, which is quite crisp and clean, seems suspiciously like a studio recording with a couple of sections of atmospheric audience laughter thrown in. Noticeably there is no tuba on this version which infers that Brian Walker wasn't present at the recording. If it is indeed a studio take it is unclear at what point when this would have been recorded. 'The Common Market Comes To Stanton Drew' on the 'B' side is a straight lift from that first LP.

Such was the publicity drummed up for this single that even the national tabloids ran stories on it!

The May 1967 issue of 'The Gramophone Magazine' gave a quick review of this single along with the second album:

You could never accuse Adge Cutler of failing to underline the implications of his modern rustic songs. Winks as loud as the slamming of a door, nudges that would fell a tree, are all carefully placed in case you should miss anything. But there’s a long tradition behind it all – the English music hall, and because of this Adge Cutler (once Acker Bilk’s road manager) may well succeed where others have failed. Anyway, his new LP, Columbia SX 6126, will most certainly have at least a short vogue. Some of the songs: When the Common Market comes to Stanton Drew / Twice Daily / Drink up thy Zider / Mabel, Mabel. They were all recorded live (extremely) in a pub in Nailsea, Somerset.

One of this month’s albums has also pupped – from the Adge Cutler LP reviewed above comes 'The Champion Dung Spreader' / 'When the Common Market comes to Stanton Drew' (Columbia DB 8145). These are self-reviewing, if you see what I mean – you will react to the songs exactly as you react to their titles.



Below - two of the numerous promotional photographs taken on the day of the single's release - 10th March 1967 - at EMI House, Manchester Square, London.

Disc and Label Variations:

This single was released on the standard Columbia EMI label and appears to have had only one pressing, sales were relatively low. Produced in mono only it was originally released on 10th March 1967.

The examples below and the associated statistics are taken from the collection of Professor Wurzel and represent what a collector should expect to find. For more information on references to matrix information (including information on acetates), vinyl tax codes , album sleeves, singles sleeves, and Columbia album labels, then refer to the Vinyl Collecting Guides on the main menu.

Image Ref. 1
​1967/68 pressing of DB8145 with the 7XCA 27865-1 and 7XCA 27866-1 matrix, pressed with a first master, first mother on side A and second mother on side B with 'R' and 'H' stampers on the A and B sides respectively.

This example has a four-pronged centre, with the embossed tax code 'KT' (indicating a pre-November 23rd 1968 pressing) and on both sides the standard 'sold in UK...' message across the centre of the label (indicating a pre-June 1969 pressing). The tax code 'KT' is also found on the run-off on both sides of the record. 

Image Ref. 2
​1967/68 pressing of DB8145 with the 7XCA 27865-1 and 7XCA 27866-1 matrix, pressed with a first master, first mother on side A and second mother on side B with 'R' and 'H' stampers on the A and B sides respectively.

​This example has a solid centre, with the embossed tax code 'KT' (indicating a pre-November 23rd 1968 pressing) and on both sides the standard 'sold in UK...' message across the centre of the label (indicating a pre-June 1969 pressing). The tax code 'KT' is also found on the run-off on both sides of the record. 

Image Ref. 3
​1967 demonstration pressing of DB8145 with the 7XCA 27865-1 and 7XCA 27866-1 matrix, pressed with a first master, first mother and 'G' stampers for both sides. Demonstration (or promotional) copies were produced for radio stations etc.
This record, with the standard Columbia white demonstration label and a large red 'A' to show the primary track, has the British release date of 10th March 1967 printed on both sides (10.3.67). Unusually, no track timings are given. This example has a four-pronged centre (no example yet found as a solid centre.) There is the embossed tax code on the disc (and this tax code also appears on each side of the disc on the vinyl run-out). The standard 'sold in UK...' message is not present as this record was for demonstration purposes only.

Collectors' Extra:


Interesting example of DB8145 -

                        'FACTORY SAMPLE NOT FOR SALE'

...as the sticker clearly shows. Most records had a few pressings with labels like this and it was purely a pressing removed from the production line for a quality assurance check. From a collector's point of view it often means that the record has been played once to test and then filed away.

Collectors' Extra:

Rare collector's item - a promotional leaflet, A4 size, promoting the band's latest single release 'The Champion Dung Spreader'.